Why should I consider a BI in Computer Science?
If you’re not sure what the BI is, you might want to read this first, “What is the BI?” If you’ve already done that, then here’s what the BI for Computer Science has to offer.

Computer Science (CS) is a growing field and a major part of almost every industry. A CS degree enables many career paths. Despite the impression sometimes given by the media, there actually are more computing jobs than qualified people to fill them in the United States. U.S. IT employment was 17% higher in 2004 than in 1999. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says computing has the greatest potential for new jobs through 2014, with five of the ten growth fields related to computing. Yes, some IT jobs have gone overseas. If you consider the expected growth in computing, it’s easy to see that companies simply need more talent. BI in CS students will graduate with innovative techniques, team experience, and business background, and become future professionals who lead new efforts or even new companies.The BI in CS is the only ABET CS accredited program in the world with a core of innovation where you will learn to do a patent, write proposals as well as start a business and work in teams.

What’s the difference between the BS and the BI when it comes to Computer Science?
The differences here are subtle but important to note. The Bachelor of Innovation in Computer Science provides students with both the technical and business background to work on innovative computer-related projects, including the ability to:

  • recognize the broader issues in computer technology-related problems
  • understand the technological, business, legal and societal constraints affecting this technology
  • communicate the key issues, needs, potential options, and final solution to a challenge

The program seeks to prepare students for successful careers and lifelong learning. In addition to the technical competence expected of a graduate with a bachelor’s degree in computer science, students will develop the innovative thinking skills, multifaceted team skills, and basic business knowledge to ensure that they can effectively compete in the changing computer career landscape for positions that are unlikely to be off-shored.

The core computer science elements of the BI in CS are nearly identical to the BS in CS, differing by adding a database and networking class in place of compilers and automata. The objectives/outcomes include all of those from the BS in CS plus the following BI specific objectives:

  • BI CS Alumni are able to work in multidisciplinary teams both as member and as a team leader
  • BI CS Alumni are able to assess business opportunities and substantially contribute to the development of a business plan
  • BI CS Alumni are able to assess customer’s needs to develop requirements and technical specifications
  • BI CS Alumni are able to develop an effective response to a call for proposal for funding

Still confused as to what the difference between the BI of CS and the BS of CS are? Read here.
Objectives
The Bachelor of Innovation™ in Computer Science will provide students with both the technical and business background to work on innovative computer-related projects, including the ability to: (1) recognize the broader issues in computer technology-related problems; (2) understand the technological, business, legal and societal constraints affecting this technology; and (3) have the ability to communicate the key issues, needs, potential options, and final solution to a challenge. The program seeks to prepare students for successful careers and lifelong learning. In addition to the technical competence expected of a graduate with a bachelor degree in computer science, students will develop the critical thinking skills, multifaceted team oriented skills and basic business background to ensure that they can effectively compete in the changing computer career landscape for positions that are unlikely to be off-shored.

The full educational objects are listed here

Degree Requirements
The degree requirements for the Bachelor of Innovations degree in Computer Science requires completion of at least 128 credit hours, a minimum 2.0-grade point average in all computer science courses and courses taken at the University of Colorado.  The courses for the degree are outlined as follows:

Innovation Core (24 Credits)

Cross Discipline Core (15 Credits)

English (3 Credits)

GPS (3 credits)

Mathematics (17 Credits)

MATH 1350 Calculus I 4
Math 1360 Calculus II 4
MATH 2150 Discrete Mathematics 3
CS 2300 Computational Linear Algebra 3
ECE 3610 Engineering Probability & Stats OR 3
     QUAN 2010 Business Statistics OR
     MATH 3180  Prob.  & Statstics

 

Science (10 credits)

Must complete one (1) full year in the same subject and at least one (1) lab
Physics 10 credits
PES 1110 General Physics I 4 credits
PES 1160 Advanced Physics Lab I 1 credit
PES 1120 General Physics II 4 credits
PES 2160 Advanced Physics Lab II 1 credit
Chemistry 10 or more credits with at least 1 lab
CHEM 1401 General Chemistry I and 1402 Chem Lab 5 credits
CHEM 1411 General Chemistry II and Chem 1412 Chem Lab 2 5 credits
CHEM 1121 CSI: Forensic Chemistry I 3 credits
CHEM 1122 CSI: Forensic Chemistry I Lab 1 credit
CHEM 1101 Chemistry in the Modern World 3 credits
CHEM 1201 Introduction to Chemistry 4 credits
Biology 10 credits (note will require one year = 8 credits in biology + a chemistry prerequisite so more than 10 total credits) Must have at least one lab
BIOL 1300 General Biology I 3 credits
BIOL 1310 General Biology I Lab 1 credit
BIOL 1350 General Biology II 3 credits
BIOL 1360 General Biology II Lab 1 credit

 

Computer Science Core (42 credits)

CS 1150 Principles of Computer Science 3 credits
CS 1450 Data Structures and Algorithms in Java 3 credits
CS 2080 Programming in UNIX 2 credits
CS 2060 Programming with C 3 credits
CS 2160 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 credits
CS 3060 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ OR CS3020 Object-Oriented Programming in C# 3 credits
CS 3160 Concepts of Programming Languages 3 credits
CS 3050 Social and Ethical Implications of Computing 1 credit
CS 3300 Software Engineering 3 credits
CS 4420 Databases 3 credits
4200 Computer Architecture 3 credits
CS 4220 Computer Networks 3 credits
CS 4500 Operating Systems I 3 credits
CS 4720 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 credits
Computer Science Elective (CS 4010 – 4890 or 5020-5990) 3 credits

Electives (17 Credits)

Free Electives 5 credits
Professional Electives (select from): 6 credits
Computer Science (3000 or above)
Electrical and Computer Engineering (2000 or above, except ECE 2400)
**Mathematics (200 or above, except MATH 4650)**  **5 credits
Science (any course satisfying natural science for compass curriculum )**
College of Business (3000 or above, except 3010,3020 and 3030)

**Mathematics/Science Electives: As needed, students choose math/science electives to bring total math/science to at least 32 credits.

 

 

How Rigorous is a BI in Computer Science?
The degree requirements for the Bachelor of Innovation™ degree in Computer Science requires completion of at least 128 credit hours, a minimum 2.0-grade point average in all computer science courses and courses taken at the University of Colorado.  It requires more computer science credits than the BS in CS. The BE in ABET accredited (reviewed in 2017-2018). The ABET review was very positive on the how the Innovation Core and teaming added value to CS education and innovation objectives of self-learning, effective teaming, and innovation, are part of the BI in CS ABET assessment criterion.
In terms of rigor, it is may also be worth noting that in the past 6 years only two UCCS Computer Science students get fully funded offers at top 20 schools to pursue their Ph.D. Both of them were BI majors. M. Wilber, BI in CS ’13, just graduated from Cornell and joined Google. Abigale Graese BI CS ’18 is now a Ph. Student at Notre Dame.

 

How Large ins the program?

The BI in CS is still smaller than the BS in CS but has been growing. In CS courses you will be in with the BS in CS students, with most classes between 30-50 students except freshman CS courses which are capped at 20. The BI core courses are generally 40-45 but with 2 instructors for those classes. You can see the number of official BI in CS Majors, with full (official) Campus enrollment data here. While we work hard to help students succeed, CS can be a difficult major and the six-year UCCS graduation rate for BI CS for a student starting in 2010 was 60%, with the remaining students transferring to other programs or universities. Note this rate is not statistically significantly different from the BS in CS.   Full graduation rate data for all campus majors can be found here.

What might my college schedule look like?
The following sample plan represents the suggested order and semesters in which students should take a course to graduate within four years. Since each student starts at a different level of mathematical ability, this listing should only be considered a guide. Specific questions about the sample program should be directed to the Engineering Advisor.

Example Major Sheet: Sample Coursework when Starting with Calculus

Sample Coursework with delayed calculus

 

Intra-University Transfer Students:

Students admitted to UCCS into the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences as “Business Intent” or “Engineering Intent” students are required to meet the College of Business intra-university transfer requirements  within two semesters of enrolling at UCCS or the College of Engineering intra-university transfer requirements  within three semesters of enrolling at UCCS in order to progress into those respective colleges’ majors. Students not meeting business or engineering intra-university transfer requirements within the allotted time for each college become ineligible for future admission into that respective college and will be advised into another degree program at the University.

Students from other colleges at UCCS may transfer into the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Students transferring into the College must have completed at least 13 credit hours at UCCS and have a cumulative CU GPA of at least 3.3, including completion of Calculus I. Students completing 30 credit hours must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at UCCS before being admitted into their major, including MATH 1350MATH 1360, and either CHEM 1401/CHEM 1402 or PES 1110.  All math courses must be completed with a grade of “B” or better for admission into the College.

Intra-University Transfer guidelines for the BI in Computer Science, Computer Security, and Game Design and Development are as follows:

  • A student may transfer into the College of EAS in a BI major without the explicit approval of an EAS faculty advisor in their major if they complete at least 15 credit hours in LAS with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, AND each course in their intended major, in the Innovation core, and in math is completed with a grade of “B” or better.